Wednesday, 24 April 2019

Foraging on a Friday


I worked Good Friday morning, but that was fine because I knew I had hatched a plan with W to while away an afternoon which was definitely going to feature tea, biccies and a spot of foraging. Together over the years we've foraged for all sorts and tried a variety of recipes. Some more successful than others it has to be said...I shall never ever make hawthorn berry chutney again for precisely that reason. Nettles and wild garlic though are a constant and always a winning combo. We even have a special secret place we go nettling where we first took our kids when they were small....they're all into their twenties now!

Our personal nettle patch is behind a rather plain church which promises little. It's in an isolated spot and is always locked, so I've never even pondered what the inside was like. However, our luck was in because two ladies pulled up to do the flowers for Easter Sunday and were happy for us to have a look round. Well I must eat my words because it is an absolute gem inside and the impact is even greater when you have no expectations. The law of sod always dictates that I shall only have my crappy phone camera with me, but fortunately W was well armed and it is with her full permission I share her photos.



 There are beautiful windows by C E Kempe with the moniker wheatsheaf and far more common Victorian style ones of saints.....


 However, what we didn't expect to find in amongst the depictions of St Michael and St George was this! Sir Galahad and the Holy Grail. I didn't really expect to find an Arthurian figure here, but now I've had the Christian symbolism explained to me by those that know I now have a better understanding of why he's been included.



After this little treat we both returned to the homesteads to concoct our soups using our chosen recipes. As is always the case we reported that it was definitely the best year yet.....as it ever is!! This is the one I cannibalise...my preference is to omit the celery and rice in favour of the wild garlic. https://www.rivercottage.net/recipes/nettle-soup It tastes wicked and is horribly good for you. Thankfully I undid all the good work by stuffing my gullet with chocolate afterwards!!

Arilx

4 comments:

  1. Can you tell us any more about that extraordinary bird up in the rafters?

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    1. I can't tell you who made it because the church has very little information about it [there are almost no photos of the interior because it's always locked] However, I am guessing the bird is an eagle and the church is called St John's. The writings of St John are symbolised by an eagle [they're usually the bird on the lecterns] More info from wikipedia here https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eagle_lectern

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  2. Sorry, but when you describe the taste as " wicked" does that mean really delicious or horrid? I am guessing the former.

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    1. Very fair question JanF. I mean it as in delicious.
      Arilx

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