Tuesday, 6 February 2018

"Bugress Hill"

"Bugress Hill" is what our family have called Burgess Hill ever since TYM inadvertently renamed it as a very small person. Although it's really not that far from here, I have only ever been once and that was for one of those interminably long and dull day long business meetings we've probably all had to endure at some point. I couldn't remember anything about it and I have to say a return visit yesterday probably explains why. Originally it was a small place which boomed with the arrival of the railway....everything is Victorian onwards and there is nothing which makes it stand out. What it does have though is the Green Circle.....

This is a fantastic set of different wildlife habitats which have been joined up into one big loop around the outside of the town. In effect it has created one of those all important wildlife corridors which allow the different species to migrate between areas and now some of it has been designated an SSI. The mixed environments of woodland, mill streams [one called Pookebourne from the old English puka meaning goblin or sprite] and the river Adur support rare species of insects including butterflies, animals [dormice] and plants. The wildflower meadows have been such a success story [only 3% of our meadows survive] the seeds are now collected and held at the Millennium Seed Bank!

Anyway enough of my waffle....a few shots we captured yesterday. Magnificent old gnarled trees stand in amongst the hedgerows and alongside newly planted coppices.



The view across to my beloved Downs.


Patterns on a fence post and shadows on the grass.



A dog walker's paradise, but the signs say you can only walk a maximum of six hounds. Dog fouling or let's say the irresponsible, lazy minority chucking filled poo bags is a problem and clearly someone had had enough. These notices were stuck on all the posts we passed!


A walk always throws up a few surprises....mine from yesterday. A decorated stone, a glass panel featuring the local Jack and Jill windmills and an eyecatching bench designed by Alison Steele.




Beyond seeing a few celandine in a sheltered spot and buds on the trees the main attraction at this time of year is the twilight spectacle of the starling murmurations. I am already making plans to make a return visit with my nature loving friend H in the summer. Meanwhile the project is still ongoing and I'll put up more photos tomorrow of what motivated me to visit in the first place.

Arilx










6 comments:

  1. Those dog poo signs are all over the internet -they must have struck a chord! Love the last three images - surprise finds are often the best x

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    1. I always enjoy the weird and wonderful stuff you turn up on your rambles with your family!
      Arilx

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  2. Lol!!,Love the dog poo note!,We could do with a few of them round where i live.Great finds on your travels yesterday and its lovely that you share them with us.I so need that front door on my house!!Burgess Hill seems to ring a bell in my mind..is it one of the train stops on the route from London to Brighton?,Debi,xx

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    1. You are quite right Debi! Burgess Hill is on the London to Brighton line.
      Arilx

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  3. Nothing quite like an old gnarled tree to stir the imagination x

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    1. Sometimes I just stand back in wonder at just how long some of these venerable trees have been there.
      Arilx

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