Thursday, 28 October 2021

Joining the garden party

 After mulling over the best place to put these two [not that I'm a dithery Libran or anything!], I finally made my mind up and Mr GBT did the honours for me. These were my birthday present from him and another chance to support a Sussex business [Brighhelmstone]. Most of what the company offer can be bought in either a green or a sandstone finish.



Arilx


8 comments:

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    1. Thank you. They add a bit of interest to an otherwise boring fence whilst we wait for the new plants we put in this year to get bigger. Arilx

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  2. Oooooh love your Green Man. I'll look them up and get something for our garden when we return next year.

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    1. If you're anywhere near them then they do let you go and pick up by arrangement [they're not a shop] and then you don't have to pay postage. Arilx

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  3. I love the second one. I bet it would be stunning on the end of my shed.

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  4. What is the history of these faces. Can you fill me in? Are they all called 'green men'? Is it a symbol of the living earth? Are there 'green women'? It seems like there should be, the earth usually seen as a fertile female? I could start googling, but I'm sure that I would fall into a rabbit hole and never be seen again. (At the very least, I'd be late for work). Let's face it, I still haven't figured out why it is that Eleanor of Castile is buried in two separate places, although I've been caught up in reading about her.

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    1. Theories abound, but they were present in pre Christian times in the Far East I believe. Many are found in our churches here and they're known by many different names. The "greenman" only dates from 1939. Within the Christian context they seem to be used to convey different messages, but they have also been picked up as a nature symbol by the pagans too. Arilx

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In the long gallery.

Lanhydrock house in Cornwall is a Jacobean marvel built in the 17th century. Tragedy struck in 1881 when a fire ripped through great swathes...