Thursday, 31 May 2018

Under the weather.



We met our friends last night for a drink and to catch up with tales of their recent two week jaunt abroad. At some point P picked up a bug and had to stay confined to barracks whilst she recovered. As soon as she said it had been a couple of days before she stopped feeling "under the weather" TWANG went the nosey bone as I suddenly thought why do we all say that and where has it come from?

Now I had always assumed that these three little words simply referenced the effect bad weather can have upon our emotions, but this apparently is not so. The full phrase is "under the weather bow" and originates from when people were travelling by sea and were on the weather bow side of the ship...this is the side which receives the full force of any bad weather. Makes a little more sense now.

More useless trivia for all ye good folks!

Arilx

5 comments:

  1. I love trivia like that! There are so many little sayings and some of them are referred to as 'old wives tales', but they must have an origin somewhere. Thank you for enlightening us.

    Joan (Devon)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's always lovely to pick up these small details from other blogs too.
      arilx

      Delete
  2. Well, fancy that, I wouldn't have guessed.
    I shall share it with all and sundry!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Many phrases have nautical origins I find.
      Arilx

      Delete
  3. How interesting...and makes sense...feet warm...head cool...and all that. x

    ReplyDelete

A bit betwixt and between

 Another visit to one of my favourite haunts....Nymans Gardens [NT] which is near here and perfect if you've only got a couple of hours ...