Monday, 28 December 2020

Not Down But Out And About

The glorious tier 4 has put paid to further afield adventuring, but the first thing I do everytime things change is immediately see what I can safely do and then start scheming. It has its advantages being a bluddy minded old bird with a very strong Sussex stubborn streak.

Usually Boxing Day would involve dancing and then a music session at the pub with an alcoholic accompaniment....this year we walked out from ours to explore a newly opened bridle path which has replaced a series of footpaths....a series of signs made it abundantly clear that they were now closed, but I was curious by the use of the word "extinguished". Legal term I presume.

 
It was a joy to end up in the local village of Warnham's churchyard [nothing new there I hear you cry] and to be greeted by this row of decorated trees. This is what I'd been hoping to see and I have to say that a bit of colourful bling on a cold, cloudy day is a welcome sight indeed. Whilst Mr GBT sorted out the mulled squash and mince pies I poked around and captured some of my favourite decorations.




You would be quite right in thinking that an orange themed tree with kangaroo decs might be a slightly unusual choice for this time of year....it's the livery and logo of a signwriting business in the village.


One tree was uber classy with its black and gold decor.  It wouldn't be my personal choice, but very sophisticated in the right setting.



I tried my best to capture this knitted pig in blanket, but the wind was against me and it wouldn't stay still, so blurred it must be I'm afraid.


An enjoyable 6 miles, but now I've got the lovely task of scraping all the mud off my boots awaiting me. Sussex is known for its thick mud [known as Sussex butter] at this time of year and it's certainly living up to its reputation!

Arilx





8 comments:

  1. Six miles! I'm impressed! Boxing Day is usually spent in the pub with friends but this year, like you, we went a wandering.
    Won't we appreciate everything so much more this time next year?xxx

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    1. I think we will, but I think I will also be keeping some of the changes this difficult experience has forced to embrace. Arilx

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  2. Thanks for the explanation of the kangaroos hopping about on the orange tree! I do enjoy hearing the stories about the odd ornaments one sometimes sees -- very much like snooping in the books on a friend's library shelves or the photos on the 'fridge.

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    1. It's the tales objects have to tell that I enjoy the most. Arilx

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  3. While we don't call it boxing Day, I can attest that we normally would have met up with friends in a pub the day after Christmas as well. It seems a universal way to enjoy the post chaos, or find friends that were otherwise busy prior to Christmas. I always enjoy your wanders and even if a familiar place, you find the new to share.

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    1. Thank you Sam! I think there may be even more local wanders for the next few weeks. Arilx

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  4. How on earth do those ornaments stay on the trees in the wind? Seems like people would be chasing ornaments all over the place. I squinted, but don't quite 'get' the pigs in a blanket ornament.

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    1. Some of them had blown down. "Pigs in blankets" are a traditional accompaniment to our Christmas turkey. They're sausages with a rasher of bacon wrapped round the middle of them. Arilx

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Peeking out.

 Sadly I can't tell you much about this old chair apart from it was carved in 1600 and is in St Edmundsbury Cathedral in Bury St Edmunds...