Friday, 18 December 2020

Wreath


"Wreath" comes from the old English writhen meaning to twist apparently. I was rather curious about why we hang these things on our doors, but their origins seem a little fluid. There's talk of the Romans having a version to signify victory [they weren't ones to let their conquests go unnoticed!] and others speak of the 16th century Lutherans in Germany have some type of Advent version. Common sense tells me that humans have always had a penchant for feathering their bower with whatever they could find to add that individual touch and long may it continue! We've got a very simple gold twiggy star here at GBT, but this splendid one is to be found in the conservation area in the town.

Hope you all have a good weekend.

Arilx

5 comments:

  1. How beautiful and unusual. I've seen so many wreaths this year and I they have all been so pretty.

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  2. I rather like wreaths, not the grave side one's I hasten to add but the one's for the door. This one is gorgeous.
    Briony
    x

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  3. What an elegant wreath, indeed, assembled to suit a chic door topped with a swag of green! Once upon a time, I'd have assumed that the house within would be decorated by a pro -- and I'd have been wrong. As you say, humans have a penchant for the individual touch and I've observed that wherever kids have made ornaments, these have place of honor. (Who made your gold twiggy star?) :)

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  4. Beautiful wreath. Ours is from a Boy Scout sale.

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  5. I DO like wreaths! I've got 3 different ones round my house- 2 are charity shopped! The third one is in the loft- I really like it and hope we can get it down!

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Peeking out.

 Sadly I can't tell you much about this old chair apart from it was carved in 1600 and is in St Edmundsbury Cathedral in Bury St Edmunds...