Friday, 23 April 2021

St George's day 2021

 Now knowing me as you do you would probably expect at the very least a dragon on this English Saint day, but no I'm ringing in the changes and offering up a slightly more unexpected picture of bluebells. 


You might not know that the bluebell is the flower of St George as its flowering season traditionally started on 23rd April [it's bang on this year then] and rather charmingly it has also been called Granfer Giggles, Witches' Thimbles and Cuckoo's Boots in the past. It is an ancient woodland indicator. The plant is poisonous, but in previous times its sap was used to bind books [it repelled insects], glue feathers to arrow shafts and the bulbs provided a starch which was used to stiffen Elizabethan ruffs.

As with almost any plant bluebells feature in folklore. It seems that you might be in all sorts of potential danger if you enter a woodland at this time of year. Beware if you hear a bluebell ring....that will attract a malevolent fairy who'll have your card marked and you will not be long for this world. If a child picks one the you will never see it again, but if you pick one that's it folks those pesky little fairies will lead you a merry dance. As a young child I picked armfuls of bluebells to take home [I should point out that this was the early 1970s when that's what you did....now we know better]....I think perhaps the fairies have been leading me astray ever since­čśĆ

Have a fabulous weekend!

Arilx




4 comments:

  1. If you're going to be lead astray, let it always be fairies. Good ones.

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    1. Or at least well intentioned ones! Arilx

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  2. Bluebells are indeed flowering in porch pots at the local Greek restaurant. The proprietor made a point of having them, now one wonders if he subscribes to ye olde customs...
    The tales of fairies told to me portrayed them as mischievous at best; malicious, at worst. Sound as 'tho you heard the same stories.

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    1. I wonder if they're British ones. The flowers on ours droop over whereas the Spanish ones are upright. Arilx

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Tracking down the track.

 We've both been enjoying catching up with Professor Alice Roberts [Mr GBT never needs an excuse to watch any programme featuring her!] ...