Thursday, 1 November 2018

A new find.

Dancing friends, who have recently joined the National Trust, made their first visit to Nymans garden last weekend. They were very enthusiastic by what they found. Personally I can't for the life of me see why you'd bother at this time of year....as the pictures from our latest visit attest­čść





Now I'd be mighty pleased to have just one flying cow on my roof. But two winged beasts and an owl...now that's just plain greedy!




This Italian urn caught my eye because of the carvings on it which are similar in feel to some of the Norman ones I've found in churches from time to time. Being quite large I expect it's been there the whole time and I've just managed to walk past it oblivious on previous occasions!



Inside the house I've finally got around to photographing this rather splendid china frog. He's a Chinese earthquake detector. He's from the 18th century and would have been filled with stones. When he started rattling I guess you would have gathered up your coat tails and made a speedy exit!


Another lovely from the 18th century, but closer to home this time. This dress made in Spitalfields has the most exquisite detailing. It's on display as part of a current exhibition.


With this rather oversized boot scraper to finish. Either it was made for giants or the Messel family  had enormous plates of meat! We were quite tickled by just how ridiculously huge it was, but then we're short hobbits and everything looks rather large from our reduced height!


Everytime I go to Nymans I question the need to take my camera and every time I'm relieved that I have as it provides an ever changing palette of colours and developing projects for me to capture. My dancing friends have already pledged to make a series of visits over the changing seasons. Once it gets under your skin there it stays!

Arilx



2 comments:

  1. When I retire and have months on end to poke around, I will revisit your blogs to plan my days. Thanks for sharing. I get what you say about taking pictures on different visits-changes are amazing.

    ReplyDelete

In the long gallery.

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